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.s. attorney. we talk about fraud and identify theft and hate crimes and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so
is absolutely essential. this is a matter of civil and human rights. >> the u.s. attorney general turns his back on the law of the land and says amnesty for illegal aliens is a civil right. the heated debate on his outrageous comment is coming up. but first, breaking news out of washington regarding the faa furloughs and those long delays at airports across the country. a live update on this developing story is next. [ engine revving ] ♪ [ male announcer ] every car we build must make adrenaline pump and pulses quicken. ♪ to help you not just stay alive.. but feel alive. the c-class is no exception. it's a mercedes-benz, through and through. see your authorized mercedes-benz dealer for exceptional offers through mercedes-benz financial services. through mercedes-benz with the bing it on challenge to show google users what they've been missing on bing. let's bing it on. [fight bell: ding, ding] how many here are google users? what if i was to tell you that you would actually like bing way more than google when it came to the results? prove it. let's look up some taco places. i like the left s
it not simply from the perspective of a civil rights lawyer, i approach it from the perspective of a parent of 3 and that informs my judgment as much as -- and my passion for this as much as anything. i can't promise, i don't know when we're going to be able to declare victory. i look at so many of the civil rights issues of our time and they have remained all too persistent but that doesn't mean we cannot continue to be dogged and i think we've seen successes. success didn't come soon enough for you and that is tragic and that's what motivates me and others to continue this work and so i hope we'll continue it together and i hope we'll be persistent. i hope we'll just demand it and as we continue to demand it, i think we'll make progress. >> my heart is heavy for your experience. i can't imagine that this will make you feel any better, nor is it my intent that you do because i wouldn't, quite frankly, belittle your grief with new laws that can't bring your son back. four years ago when what happened to you happened, we didn't have a federal government that ensured that lgbt youth were going
and lesbian americans as part and parcel, a continuation of the civil rights struggle. >> what people forget is that women's liberation, everything even that's happening now with gay rights is started with the civil rights movement. i always find it very peculiar. people who want rights and forget about who started it, you know, so human rights is human rights. so you can't be for gay rights and still be, you know, racist against anybody. as julian bond said, as you just stated, it started with the civil rights movement and the woman's rights movement came after that, now we're going with the gay movement. >> but there are people, and i've talked to a number of african-americans, who do not believe -- or who in fact defended that comparison, who say, you know, look, it's completely different. >> anderson, there is no -- i cannot make any excuse for that. there are i would say a large segment of african-americans who are very homophobic. there's no getting around that. >> where do you think that comes from? >> in fact, chris boussard came out yesterday on air -- he didn't come out but he said
, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing everyone together to stop this disturbing trend so please welcome assistant secretary for civil rights, rus
in the civil rights movement -- the children's march. beginning on may 2nd, 1963, in birmingham, alabama, thousands of elementary and high school students braved police dogs and fire hoses to march against segregation. many of them were arrested and put in jail. their crusade galvanized the nation, and ultimately helped to end segregation. kim lawton has our story. >> at the civil rights institute in birmingham, alabama, local students are on a field trip learning how 50 years ago, kids around their age played a pivotal role in the struggle against segregation. one of them was freeman hrabowski, who is now president of the university of maryland, baltimore county. he was 12 at the time and a math whiz. >> i was not a courageous kid. i did not get into fights. the only thing i would attack was a math problem. and so, this was not about courage at all, it was about having a dream of a better day. >> in 1963, birmingham was considered one of the most segregated places in the u.s. >> children knew, children of col were well aware we were consired second clas. >> reverend martin luther king,
to that. and it is about state leadership, not just looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point o
summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's will send you a
-up thing. and later the march goes on our series on civil rights continues with a look at one of the most shocking and defining moments of the entire era. it's "the war room" on a monday and we will be right back. (vo) later tonight current tv is the place for compelling true stories. >> jack, how old are you? >> nine. >> this is what 27 tons of marijuana looks like. (vo) with award winning documentaries that take you inside the headlines, way inside. (vo) from the underworld, to the world of privilege. >> everyone in michael jackson's life was out to use him. (vo) no one brings you more documentaries that are real, gripping, current. >> "viewpoint" digs deep into the issues of the day. >> has the time finally come for real immigration reform? >> with a distinctly satirical point of view. if you believe in state's rights but still believe in the >> only on current tv. you know who is coming on to me now? you know the kind of guys that do reverse mortgage commercials? those types are coming on to me all the time now. (vo) she gets the comedians laughing and the thinkers thinking. >
this year so it's very exciting to see everybody talking about civil rights litigate or heroes which i think they are. >> what is next in the film and what do you see for film and how do people learn more about it. >> the film will be on hbo in july in the summer series which is great because they do a lot of marketing. we are selecting the open night. which is a thousand seat audience. it is the premier selection. it's at the film festival as it went to sundance and they voted it and it's a film we would like to bring home. we are doing as many film festivals as we can. we won the audience award and jury award in miami and doing as many speaking and community talk back events. the film i hope will become a gathering point for people to use and say this is what's happening in our jurisdiction. this shows the experience of just a few lawyers. there are many people struggling to do a great job across the country. >> what's your website? >> we'll be taking questions. now let's move to john rapping who is one of the individuals featured in the film. john, i remember when you first talked about s
'll head down to north carolina where the civil rights activists from yesterday are being called off the bench to right some of today's wrongs. and an ad with teeth and one that doesn't pull any punches. when you're going up against the nra that's the type the hard ball you need to be playing. we'll talk guns in america right after this. >> if you believe in state's rights but still support the drug war you must be high. >> "viewpoint" digs deep into the issues of the day. >> do you think that there is any chance we'll see this president even say the words "carbon tax"? >> with an open mind... >> has the time finally come for real immigration reform? >> ...and a distinctly satirical point of view. >> but you mentioned "great leadership" so i want to talk about donald rumsfeld. >> (laughter). >> watch the show. >> only on current tv. current tv is the place for true stories. with award winning documentaries that take you inside the headlines. real, gripping, current. documentaries... on current tv. "the war room" will continue to remind that you america has a gun crisis on its hands.
on the effect the letter and the civil-rights movement and dr. king's believe in the urgency of the movement. this is an hour and 15 minutes. >> good evening. welcome. we are pleased you have joined us this evening. also want to welcome our good friends from c-span who are kidding tonight's program. it will be broadcast on booktv at a future time. also please note we have books for sale in the back and i am sure our authors will be happy to sign those for you. the doors are locked. you cannot leave until all the books have been sold. martin luther king often quoted the nineteenth century abolitionist thomas parker who said the arc of the universe is long but bends toward justice. i was thinking about that today as we set up and prepared for this program because today is april 9th. on april 9th, 1963, 50 years ago this very day, four young black college students walked in the front door of this building down stairs, went over to a table and sat down and started to read. one of them described to me later he was scared he was about to be arrested. birmingham's libraries in those days were segre
to come out, grew up in rural louisiana and witnessed horrors of segregation. during civil rights movement saw bravery among the ugliest aspects of humanity, thinks i am opening up to prejudice and hatred. i say in a way it is preemptive, shouldn't live under the threat of being outed. the announcement should be mine to make, not tmz'. is that stuff you thought about coming out? >> definitely. i am glad jason reframed it in such a way. i think there's an overwhelming notion that the african-american is homophobic. i think we're seeing jason's family that's african-american is loving him, that nba players from kobe bryant to paul pierce give him overwhelming support, so it reframes the idea that the african-american is homophobic because it is not true. >> you have been very out front on this issue, there's talk about gay rights being a civil right. do you think the black community and athletic community is out of place, where they're ready for equality on every level? >> i think a lot of both communities are. what jason did today brings don't ask, don't tell to another level, around this c
regulation implementing section 504 of rehab act of 1973 which was the first civil rights protection with persons with disability in the history of the united states and set off the independent living and civil rights movement. we are in good company there on market street. our new place is really lovely. we have some private office space where we can hold very confidential meetings that we have with our client base. we also have an open architectural access area that allows us to meet in large groups with the architects plans and other city departments that we work with on other minute projects and we have a space that is going to be handy soon. although it's going to be under construction, we would like to use these offices for some of the meetings for the executive committee meeting that will be taking place next tuesday. we would also like to start holding our physical access community meetings and disability disaster preparedness meeting there. it will help us a lot to hold these meetings at our office because we are currently under staff and if we can remain in the office then
a feeling of real civil rights and safety where i live. is a greater source of tension and our neighbor. and the economy is just sort of rooming in the last few years especially now since the discovery of oil. there is all kinds of apprehension and tension in terms of what would happen in the next year. at it is generally speaking place that i find great dignity and great power. people -- education is the cornerstone of people's lives. if they do not have anything, they will have the school uniform and make sure the school fees are paid whether you go from house to house to collect it or whatever, the school must the -- we must go to school. that kind of emphasis, in contrast to india where poverty is so extreme and the wealth is so extreme and beggars and the have-nots and the halves are constantly juxtaposed with each other. in uganda, i have never seen that level of poverty. even though we have so much less than india does. because people have their food, they have their bases of living. and there is a certain kind of existence of civil rights which you can breathe and you can be eas
of this nation. it was 50 years ago today birmingham, alabama, what the front line in the fight for civil rights and it wasn't going well. then children joined the battle and as michelle miller tells us, everything changed. >> reporter: this is where you started your day? >> this is where the started -- this is where i started the day. may 2, 1963. >> reporter: james stewart was just 15 when he first descended these steps, one of 1,000 children who were determined to protest the city's segregation laws, a social code birmingham would not give up easily. >> we said enough is enough is enough, we're not living with this. when they are brought the dogs and the water hoses out, that was a greater weapon that they were deploying. so for me, it was wartime. >> reporter: those water hoses were held by birmingham firemen. arnetta streeter-gary was there, too. she was 16. seeing these images at the birmingham civil rights museum brought it all back. >> i still remember that water. i don't think i will ever forget that water. when you would run, they had the dogs waiting. i thank the lord they did not put
-american example the civil rights movement english i think this is a little-known fact. civil rights did not come to america in one bill in 1964. that was public accommodation the voting rights came in 1965. nondiscrimination and employment and housing came in 1968 and 1972. and voting rights is extended to language minority, latinos and asians in 1975. so literally what you had was an 11 year wave of good bills that address the problems. and my point is this cycle we should get the best deal possible. but it should be a good deal. and if we don't then we should continue given that they say we have all the political power, 15 million registered voters next cycle it with the 18 million, then 29, even though we have all this political power, that this fight may go on and if we don't get a good bill, which would be a fight for a good build. >> we have a few other people i want to take this conversation too. i'm anxious to get back around to thomas here was at the table literally for these conversations in washington. but before i move on there's a few people who haven't spoken yet. let me push back
is a matter of civil and human rights. lou: it is inspiring and i can not find any connection to either civil rights or to rights, nor have i heard anyone suggestion that people acting in countervention of your laws and civility are entitled to civil rights. >> yeah, people who are not americans,e don't owe them anything. anything. i wish the rest of the world luck but we're sinks the boat here. lou: all elites of left and right are combined spending $1.5 billion from 2008 to 2012, lobbying on this one issue. more than any other issue before the u.s. congress and senate. >> yeah, they want cheap labor, and let the rest of us make up the difference in the wages they pay their workers, i have never seen an issue with elites elected representatives on one side, and american people on other side, if you said in your chalkboard segment that is why they have to lie to see marco rubeo saying they will not be able to college any government assess stan, you said that on facts news sunday, a week after -- senate voted down we know as we said in chalkbod segment about 50% of illegal immigrants are colle
transcends the issue of immigration status. this is matter of civil and human rights. >> lou: it's inspiring. i can't find any connection whatsoever to your civil rights or i haven't heard anyone suggest that people who are acting in contra investigation of your laws are somehow entitled to civil rights? >> people the people aren't americans. you are sinking the boat here. >> lou: why is it that the chamber of commerce, business roundtable, all of the elites on the right and left are combined? they spent, by the way, $1.5 billion from 2008 to 2012 lobbying on this one issue, more than any other issue before the u.s. congress and senate. >> they want cheap labor. rest of us make up the difference. i have never seen an issue the elite the elected representatives and media or one side and that is why they have to lie. to see marco rubio saying, oh, no, they won't be able to collect any government assistance of. he said a week after they voted down to prevent illegal aliens to get benefits under obamacare. about 50% of illegal immigrants are collecting welfare now. >> lou: it is a peculiar time
struggle for civil rights. [applause] "this is the day." how did this book get started? it was president president obama in his first term. he said, i am here because you are all -- in america 50 years ago what did i think america was? it was all things to me. my husband's home country, my new jewish family, robin and benjamin. leonard's cousins and lots of americans. we came here from amsterdam to photograph people. i have no photo of myself and of our seven-month stay in america but sweet pictures of our 4-year-old daughter, her grandparents and cousins. leonard was very frugal. he needed all film for his projects. nothing got wasted. he said i wished i had a picture of myself and of leonard at the march on washington. i only had my eyes. and these eyes looked and looked, i would say all these faces and then leonard asked me how i liked the day? i would say all these faces. the march was america for me and then the speech of dr. martin came, "i have a dream." the speech moved like a wave over the heads of all those people. the voice was strong. a preacher's voice. it reached everyone.
. a coalition of civil rights describes as. a lack of minority - owned businesses working on the new stadium. project officials deny the contractors of all races an equal opportunity to participate. they add, more than half of the 1,000- plus of minority groups. and that under an anti- affirmative- action law passed by california voters, project be "color blind". when selecting the firms involved. that project involves roughly 60 public sub- contracts. worth more than 700 - million dollars. the new 49er stadium is slated to open in 2014. >> huge day in sports including the giants, a's, and the n-f-l draft plus. the big story.he warriors first home playoff game in six years comes down to one final shot. gary shows you what happened.next! kron 4 news is rolling out a new program called kron rewards. for the entire month of april, watch kron 4 news at eight in the morning or eight at night and you can earn valuable points you can redeem for prizes, cash cards or exclusive kron 4 items. we'll show you a word of the day during those times, you then enter that word on kron 4 rewards and start earn
. , and restrictions on civil rights. almost he posted on the streets are subject to fines or prison. onhomeless people posted the streets are subject to fines or prison. they cook volunteer meals for the needy. he has been living on the streets for 14 years. he says he has never been treated as badly as now. he says he feels like a fourth class citizen, and that the homeless are not even treated as citizens. he says he can only find work on a black market. the government says there are always jobs available to the homeless, but that is not true. they belong to a student network set up last year via social media. they protested against the fourth constitutional revision, which cracks down on the homeless. to thefourth amendment constitution was a big point in this whole protest. >> he acknowledges that one of the problems is that the opposition is unable to unite and join forces. >> we are angry. we want change. ,he way things are working here you have to see that this is a long process. no one has ever managed to crumble the current government. >> they hope they can help change hungary in the long run
i have always been passionate about civil rights and equality for everyone, and i have a 10-year-old daughter, so having a girl has made me much more sensitive to gender equality and other issues, but i guess i have always been someone that is vocal about my politics, but as a supervisor, and having to listen to many perspectives before making key decisions. as an activist in chinatown, i have always felt that working families and people who work in our neighborhoods need to have much more support. it is always about giving more voice to immigrants or the underserved and workers in the city. that is what drives my passion as a supervisor. >> tell me about the process of running for supervisor. what did you learn from the campaign process? was anything surprising? supervisor mar: i had to move from being a regular person that barely gets his kid to school on time and makes her a healthy lunch to having to go to a photo opportunities. i was on the school board for eight years, i had some training. and i was in the democratic party central committee for years before that and was one
robinson and jason collins robinson comes in advance of civil rights. collins, more of a reflection of struggle. i guess, my point is, are we as a collective making too big of a deal of him as a symbol? >> let me be very clear. absolutely not. i was just responding to a question like compare and contrast. jackie robinson appearing in 1947 in major league baseball eight years before the montgomery busboy cotts and the start of the civil rights movement. this is different. jason collins appearing in 2014, appearing loud and proud as an active gay athlete. 2013. sorry. it is a little early. coming out in 2013 really on a wave of what's been some mammouth changes over the last several years. that's a very different dynamic in terms of this kind of presence. we are not making too big of a deal out of it. oftentimes in the sports media world, we confuse hype with substance. look at tebow, tim, as an example of that. this is one of the cases where the substance is greater than the hype. this is truly a historic moment in the world of sports. >> let me get to twitter, because it blew up on
if the -- town happened to be where the three civil right workers were killed, three white and one black. was that a coincidence or was that a overtone to the people who seemed to connect with the dots? >> host: thank you, sir. >> guest: thank you for the question. i have not studied that particular incident so i can't tell you for sure what was going on there i do remember the press coverage at the time and there was a lot of turn about that in certain quarters. i'd like to think it was a coincidence, and i'd like to think that what reagan really was doing, though, was definitely trying to appeal to disaffected white voters in the south, who he knew would be key to his campaign as president. and a key component of that appeal has often been, since the 1964 signing of the civil rights act by a democratic president, key component has always been saying we're the party that is going to stand up for white people as opposed to being a party that grant all these rights to black people. and it's an unfortunate chapter and it's one reason why our poll particulars have used code words, because w
making san francisco the rights to civil council city, the city of gideon. there are civil cases, eviction cases, family law cases where the consequences, the results followed in court are almost as severe to what gideon faced and what people face in criminal cases. what we recognize at the outset of the supervisors proclamation is part inspirational, our leaders in the community have rallied around it and the bar association and our firms have taken on more conviction cases. later we'll be holding an event to thank people in these positions and so please stay tuned about that. in the meantime let's focus on gideon and the public defenders role. i would say if there is ever a time and place to turn the tied and to bring the &m music back to gideon's trumpet. we thank you and look forward to a great day. thank you. [ applause ] >> about a year-and-a-half go we saw one of the most dramatic shifts when the state took funding and reallocated to local and housing for state prisoners. our next speaker chief probation officers not only in san francisco but statewide. she's here to give
for civil rights. >> jon: you're right, jason jones. that would have been awesome. we'll have to wait. we'll have to wait for football. we'll wait for football. >> that's right. that's right. don't blow it for me welcome back. my guest tonight, oh, we have a new film. iron man 3. >> working on it, sir. this is a prototype. ( cheers and applause ). >> jon: robert downey, jr. we love you! ( cheers and applause ). >> jon: so... so. jon: i hope this works out for you. >> thanks, jon. i'm plugging away. >> jon: i think that's right. i think that's right. this phenomenon. >> right. jon: is insanity. it's worldwide insanity. >> yes. i should come out right now. >> jon: it would be dramatic. ( cheers and applause ). people are shaking with excitement and glee. >> right. i mean, i feel this way about, you know, the movies that i was really into growing up. i love the enthusiasm. >> jon: were you a super hero guy growing up? your father was a director so you were involved in film. >> i mean i was around movies ought time. they were underground movies. very cool stuff. but i mean i remember when i s
and to intervene to help. there is nothing civil about letting somebody without their right mind decompensate to the to point that they lose their lives and sometimes other people lose their lives. our mother recently had called me and said that her son had been on the streets because he also left their house and the police called her first thing in the morning. she hadn't seen him in a long time and he had paranoid schizophrenia. they said your son is in the hospital. we arrested him on a 51/50. he was walking naked in the street in the middle of the night talking to himself. the mother and father jumped in the car and went to the emergency room and by the time they got there, the hospital had released him. i don't understand this. it's just, you know, i'm not a lawyer and i wasn't in the mental health field before, i just, i don't understand it. the qualifications and criteria for a holder extreme and they are unrealistic. a person much be imminently danger to self or others or gravely disabled before they are picked up. if your shelter is under a freeway, if he knows of a garbage can that
of "courage of the moment: the civil rights struggle, 1961-1964." mr. wallace, why did you select these certain photos in your book? >> these photographs were all taken when i was in chapel hill as a student working for the student newspaper, "the daily tarheel." and the civil rights movement at that time was working towards getting a public accommodations law that eventually came apart in 1964. the student newspaper supported the marchers. of we had some black students in chapel hill at that time and felt that if they couldn't eat in the same restaurants with all the rest of us, that budget right. and -- that wasn't right. and so all of these photographs were taken initially for either the student newspaper or for -- i served as a stringer for some of the local wire service is the and what not. today in publishing the book one of the purposes was to let some of today's generation that still live in chapel hill and are descendants from the people many these photographs know and you said what their parent -- know and understand what their parents and grandparents did so that they c
by the way is a civil rights like every other civil rights we've been through in this country is part of the future. and it's going to have to be part of immigration reform, if not now very soon. >> john: so let me ask you to speculate into the mind of marco rubio. how nervous do you think he is over this provision or does this give him a get out of making a commitment free card. >> i think he's nervous about this provision, to be honest with you. he has gone so far down this road, if he let's this stop him it sinks his 2016 aspiration. he brought everybody in this dance. he brought the horse up to the water. it wouldn't drink his credibility within his caucus is also damaged at that point. >> john: david you're saying you agree. there is not a change that senator rubio could tell the latino population of the america that we're the gap we're fighting for you? >> i agree with sam on this. marco rubio has talked his political future, presidential ambitions if he has those and i think he might is staked on immigration reform. he has put his career into this. he's not going to walk away.
the gauntlet this week and calling it a civil rights issue. >> the state is turning into a . those at middle and bottom are doing worse. >> jill, boil it down for us. what are the main points the governor is proposing in the plan? >> what the governor wants to do is make a complicated funding system simpler. instead of giving money to schools on old formulas and not teaching and what they need, he is saying let's give everybody a base amount from $6,300 to $7,200 depending on the grade level. you will get more if you have students that are more difficult to teach and they have more issues and they need more time and attention. it is a fairly simple system on the face of it that says if you have these kids, this is how much money you will get. >> the thinking is the extra money will be used for more teachers or tutors? what? >> you know what? the benefit of this proposal according to the districts is they get to decide. there are a lot of restrictions on how the money is spent. i equate it if you want red carpet, you get the red carpet money. otherwise you don't get that money. this plan and
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 274 (some duplicates have been removed)